Issue 35, Final Fringe

Lemonade

by Clarisse Hart, Clarisse Hart 06.23.2013

Fringe published its last issue on Monday, June 24. As part of the goodbye, we asked former contributors and staff to write about their experiences with the magazine.

Fringe was the first literary journal I ever submitted work to. One of the poems the magazine published remains my most experimental work. I remember the queer feeling of having the piece accepted, as if I was four years old again, astounded that a stranger would buy the sour lemonade I had prepared in my kitchen. I hadn’t yet decided whether or not I liked the stuff, but here was someone exclaiming, “Delicious!”—and meaning it.

Six years later, I still associate Fringe with that sensation of courage bubbling up and spilling over into willing hands, a potent mix of sour and sweet and whatever else comprises the mystery of successful art.

Fringe has encouraged dozens of writers to be fearless in the knowledge that strangers will try their experiments on their tongues. As the magazine closes its doors, I hope that courage will keep roiling in Fringe’s writers and readers. It certainly does in me.

Clarisse Hart

Clarisse Hart

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Clarisse Hart is a writer, educator, and scientist who lives and works in rural Massachusetts. As Outreach Manager at the Harvard Forest, she translates environmental research for the people who can most benefit from it, which is everyone. She holds an MFA in Nonfiction Writing from Emerson College and a BA in Environmental Studies from Mount Holyoke College. Previously, she has studied humpback whales on Cape Cod, tallied spiders in remote New England bogs, reviewed poetry for The Atlantic, and taught research writing to undergraduates. Her writing is featured or forthcoming in the Christian Science Monitor, the Harvard GazetteWorcester Living Magazine, and many scientific publications.

Clarisse Hart

Clarisse Hart

Read More

Clarisse Hart is a writer, educator, and scientist who lives and works in rural Massachusetts. As Outreach Manager at the Harvard Forest, she translates environmental research for the people who can most benefit from it, which is everyone. She holds an MFA in Nonfiction Writing from Emerson College and a BA in Environmental Studies from Mount Holyoke College. Previously, she has studied humpback whales on Cape Cod, tallied spiders in remote New England bogs, reviewed poetry for The Atlantic, and taught research writing to undergraduates. Her writing is featured or forthcoming in the Christian Science Monitor, the Harvard GazetteWorcester Living Magazine, and many scientific publications.

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